MY Romeo and Juliet

How Juliet and Tybalt are related cousins
Sampson and Gregory servants for the Capulets
Abram and Balthasar servants for the Montagues
How Prince Escalus and Mercutio are related cousins
3 types of Love -unrequited love >Romeo & Rosaline-Real love >Romeo & Juliet-Ribald love >Mercutio & Nurse
Mercutio represents renaissance
Romeo represents Dark ages
Queen Mab speech -men are ruled by whims of fairies/supernatural forces-dreams = fantasies of repressed-early = makes fun of people’s own follies-later = evil presence can harm innocent people
In text citation for verse play list act, scene, and line #’s seperated by . (3.2.21-23)
Death chart Capulet -Tybalt-JulietMontague-Romeo-Lady MontaguePrince -Mercutio-Paris-Deus es machina
Blank verse – rhythm of 5 containing 1 unstressed & 1 stressed syllable (can be used w/ 2 characters)Ex Act 1 scene IV Romeo: I dreamed/a dream/tonightMercutio: and so/did IEx Act 1 Scene V Romeo: for I/never saw/true beau/ty
Act 1 scene IV Romeo: I dreamed/a dream/tonightMercutio: and so/did IAct 1 Scene V Romeo: for I/never saw/true beau/ty Blank verse
Alliteration – words that have same 1st consonant Ex Act III scene I Romeo: this day’s black fate on more days doth depend
Act III scene I Romeo: this day’s black fate on more days doth depend Alliteration
External conflict – struggle w/ character & outside forcesEx Act III scene IMercutio & Tybalt fight
Act III scene IMercutio & Tybalt fight External conflict
Internal conflict – struggle w/ thoughtsEx Act III scene IIJuliet’s dilemma over whether or not to love/hate Romeo for killing Tybalt
Act III scene IIJuliet’s dilemma over whether or not to love/hate Romeo for killing Tybalt Internal conflict
Verbal Irony – language to express opposite of whats expected Ex Act II scene VJuliet -> La. Cap: How my heart abbors/ to hear him named & cannot come to him./ To weak the love/ I bore my cousin/ upon his body that hath slaughtered him!
Act II scene VJuliet -> La. Cap: How my heart abbors/ to hear him named & cannot come to him./ To weak the love/ I bore my cousin/ upon his body that hath slaughtered him! Verbal Irony
Cosmic irony/Irony of fate -god changing human expectationsEx Act III scene I Romeo after slaying Tybalt: O, I am fortune’s fool
Act III scene I Romeo after slaying Tybalt: O, I am fortune’s fool Cosmic irony/Irony of fate
Aubade -day or night?Ex Act II scene VJuliet -> Romeo: wilt thou be gone? is it not yet year near day/ it was the nightingale, and not the lark
Act II scene VJuliet -> Romeo: wilt thou be gone? is it not yet year near day/ it was the nightingale, and not the lark Aubade
Image – words that paint a picture / use sensesEx Act III scene VJuliet -> Romeo: Methinks I see there, now thou art so low./ As one dead in the bottom of a tomb./ either my eyesight fails or thou lookest pale
Act III scene VJuliet -> Romeo: Methinks I see there, now thou art so low./ As one dead in the bottom of a tomb./ either my eyesight fails or thou lookest pale Image
Climax – peak tension at highestEx Act III scene IRomeo after killing Tybalt
Act III scene IRomeo after killing Tybalt Climax
Anachronism -anything out of time/doesn’t fit Ex Act III scene III Romeo -> Friar: As if that name./ shot from the deadly level of a gun./ did murder her
Act III scene III Romeo -> Friar: As if that name./ shot from the deadly level of a gun./ did murder her Anachronism
Triadic Argument Logos = Tybalt would’ve killed RomeoPathos = Will emotionally kill JulietEthos = Suicide leads to hell
Metaphor -implied/hidden comparison w/ little in common Ex Act IV scene vLord Capulet -> La Capulet: upon the sweetest flower of all the field
Act IV scene vLord Capulet -> La Capulet: upon the sweetest flower of all the field Metaphor
Paradox -contrary to previous expectationsEx Act III scene II Juliet’s response to Romeo killimg Tybalt: O serpen heart, hid with a flowering face!/ Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?/ Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!
Act III scene II Juliet’s response to Romeo killimg Tybalt: O serpen heart, hid with a flowering face!/ Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?/ Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! Paradox
Allusion -reference to any person, place, or history Ex Act III, scene IIJuliet’s soliloquy: Gallop apace, you fiery footed steeds./ Towards phoebus lodging! such a wagoner/ As phaeton would whip you to the west/ and bring in cloudy night immediately”
Act III, scene IIJuliet’s soliloquy: Gallop apace, you fiery footed steeds./ Towards phoebus lodging! such a wagoner/ As phaeton would whip you to the west/ and bring in cloudy night immediately” Allusion
Act IV scene v: Lord Capulet -> Paris & Friar: Death is my son in law, Death is my heir/ My daughter he hath wedded” Personification
metonymy -subsitution of name of attribute, w/ thing meantEx Act III scene IIIFriar: I see that madmen have no earsRomeo: How should they, when that wise men have no eyes
Act III scene IIIFriar: I see that madmen have no earsRomeo: How should they, when that wise men have no eyes metonymy
Personification -giving non-living things living attributesEx Act IV scene v: Lord Capulet -> Paris & Friar: Death is my son in law, Death is my heir/ My daughter he hath wedded”
Act III scene IIIFriar: I see that madmen have no earsRomeo: How should they, when that wise men have no eyes metonymy
Apostrophe -address to someone who is not presentEx Act III scene VJuliet after Romeo left her: O fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle!
sonnet -poem of 14 linesEx Prologue
Act III scene VJuliet after Romeo left her: O fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle! Apostrophe
antithesis -2 opposite ides are combined to create a contrast effectEx Act I Scene I Romeo -> Rosaline: here’s much to do with Hate, but more to do with loveEx Act I Scene VJuliet about Romeo: My only love sprung from my only hate
Act I Scene I Romeo -> Rosaline: here’s much to do with Hate, but more to do with loveAct I Scene VJuliet about Romeo: My only love sprung from my only hate antithesis
pun – play on words for humourEx Act I scene IVRomeo -> Mercutio: You have dancing shoes with nimble soles: I have a soul of lead
Act I scene IVRomeo -> Mercutio: You have dancing shoes with nimble soles: I have a soul of lead pun
couplet -2 successive whyming lines in a verseEx Act I scene IBenvolio -> Romeo: But in that crystal scales let there be weighed / your lady’s love against some other maid
Act I scene IBenvolio -> Romeo: But in that crystal scales let there be weighed / your lady’s love against some other maid couplet
quatrain -4 lime stanzaEx Act I scene II Capulet’s speech -> Paris
Act I scene II Capulet’s speech -> Paris quatrain
oxymoron -adjective followed by noun w/ contrasting meaning
aside -comment character says to audience, but not other characters
soliloquy -reveal thought of a character through personal speech
lyric poetry -emotional rhyming poem
simile -comparison using like/asEx Act II Scene IIJuliet -> Romeo: I have no joy of this contract tonight. It is too rash, unadvised, too sudden; I too like lightning
Act II Scene IIJuliet -> Romeo: I have no joy of this contract tonight. It is too rash, unadvised, too sudden; I too like lightning simile
hyperbole – exaggeration for emphasisExAct II scene IIRomeo -> Juliet: Alacl, there lies more peril in thine eye/than twenty their swords
Act II scene IIRomeo -> Juliet: Alacl, there lies more peril in thine eye/than twenty their swords hyperbole
internal rhyme -rhyme w/ words in middle & end of one lineEx Act I Scene IIlord Capulet -> Paris: But saying over what I said before
Act I Scene IIlord Capulet -> Paris: But saying over what I said before internal rhyme
monologue -speaker addresses listener/speakerExAct I Scene IVMercutio queen mab speech
Act I Scene IVMercutio queen mab speech monologue
dramatic irony -the audience knows something the characters do notEx Act II scene I Mercutio and Benvolio are unaware that Romeo no longer loves Rosaline
Act II scene I Mercutio and Benvolio are unaware that Romeo no longer loves Rosaline dramatic irony
assonance -same vowel soundEx Act II scene IIJuliet -> Romeo: O gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nounce it faithfully
Act II scene IIJuliet -> Romeo: O gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nooiet -> Romeo: *O* gently R*o*me*o*, If th*o*u d*o*st l*o*ve pr*o*nounce it faithfully assonance
When was Shakespeare born? April 23, 1564
Where was Shakespeare born? Stratford-on-Avon, England (a market town)
Who was Shakespeare’s father? John Shakespeare, a shopkeeper and former high baliff(mayor)
What was the extent of Shakespeare’s formal education? grammar school where he learned Latin
How old was he when he married who and how many children did they have? 18Anne Hathaway3
Who were Shakespeare’s children? Susannah, Judith, and Hamnet . Hamnet died at age 11.Judith and Hamnet are twins.
What was a nickname for the Globe Theater? the wooden O
When were plays performed? in the daytime
What are groundlings? paid one penny to stand in front of the stage
Why was theater such universally popular entertainment? affordable for all classes
Who was the acting not respectable by? English Puritans
What was Romeo and Juliet based on? a long narrative Italian poem called The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet
What does “star-crossed lovers” mean? fate against them (people believed in the stars, astologyand destiny
What medium is Romeo and Juliet written in? both poetry and prose(not poetry)
“Part, fools!/Put up your swords. You know not what you do.” Benvolio
“What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word/As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee./Have at thee, coward!” Tybalt
“But Montague is bound as well as I,/In penalty alike and ’tis not hard, I think,/For men so old as we to keep the peace.” Lord Capulet
“and ’tis not hard, I think,/For men so old as we to keep the peace.” Benvolio
“O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you./She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comes/In shape no bigger than an agate stone” Mercutio
“My only love, sprung from my only hate!/Too early seen unknown, and known too late!” Juliet
“But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?/It is the East, and Juliet is the sun!” Romeo
“O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?/Deny thy father and refuse thy name,Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,/And I’ll no longer be a Capulet” Juliet
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose/By any other word would smell as sweet” Juliet
“Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow/That I shall say good night till it be morrow” Juliet
“Within the infant rind of this weak flower/Poison hath residence and medicine power In man as well as herbs – grace and rude will,/And where the worser is predominant,/Full soon the canker death eats up that plant” Friar Lawrence
“Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford/No better term than this: thou art a villian” Tybalt
“No, ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as/a church door; but ’tis enough, ’twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.” Mercutio
“but ’tis enough, ’twill serve. Ask for/me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man” Mercutio
“O, I am fortune’s fool!” Romeo
“And for that offense/Immediately we do exile him hence” Prince
“O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!” Juliet
“”Romeo is banished” – to speak that word/Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,/All slain, all dead” Juliet
“‘Tis torture, and not mercy. Heaven is here,/Where Juliet lives and every cat and dog/And little mouse, every unworthy thing,/Live here in heaven and may look on her, But Romeo may not” Romeo
“Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day” Juliet
“Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, And therefore have I little talked of love, For Venus smiles not in a house of tears” Paris
“Come, vial. What if this mixture do not work at all? Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?” Juliet
“Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field” Capulet
“Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir” Capulet
“I dreamt my lady came and found me dead/(Strange dream that gives a dead man leave to think!)And breathed such life with kisses in my lips/That I revived and was an emperor” Capulet
“I dreamt my lady came and found me dead (Strange dream that gives a dead man leave to think!) And breathed such life with kisses in my lips That I revived and was an emperor” Romeo
“The world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law The world affords no law to make thee rich Then be not poor, but break it and take this” Romeo
“Sweet Flowers thy bridal bed I strew (O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones) Which with sweet water nightly I will dew; Or, wanting that, with tears distilled by moans. The obsequies that I for thee will keep Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.” Paris
“Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,And in despite I’ll cram thee with more food.” Romeo
“O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.” Romeo
“O comfortable friar! Where is my lord?” Juliet
“Yea, noise? Then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger! This is thy sheath there rust, and let me die.” Juliet
“See what a scourge is laid upon your hate.That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.And I, for winking at your discords too,Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punished.” Prince
O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. Romeo

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