Hamlet Literary Devices

synecdoche A whole is represented by naming one of its parts (genus named for species), or vice versa (species named for genus).”So the whole ear of Denmark/ Is by a forg├Ęd process of my death/ Rankly abused.””Good Hamlet… let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark”
anaphora repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines[being overly upset when your father dies] “tis *a fault* to heaven, /*a fault* against the dead,/ a faulta faulterly upset when your father dies] “tis *a fault* to heaven, /*a fault* against the dead,/ a fault to nature…”
polysyndeton employing many conjunctions between clauses”Tis not alone my inky cloak… *nor* customary suits of solemn black,/*Nor* windy suspiration of forced breath…/ norNornot alone my inky cloak… *nor* customary suits of solemn black,/*Nor* windy suspiration of forced breath…/ nor the dejected havior of the visage…/That can denote me truly”
asyndeton The omission of conjunctions between clauses, often resulting in a hurried rhythm or vehement effect.
metaphor A comparison made by referring to one thing as another.
tricolon Three parallel elements of the same length occurring together in a series.
stichomythia dialogue in which two characters speak alternate lines of verse, used as a stylistic device in ancient Greek drama.QUEEN: Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.HAMLET: Mother, you have my father much offended.QUEEN: Come, come, you answer with an idle tongue.HAMLET: Go, go, you question with a wicked tongue.
conceit An extended metaphor. Unlike allegory, which tends to have one-to-one correspondences, a conceit typically takes one subject and explores the metaphoric possibilities in the qualities associated with that subject.
apostrophe one addresses oneself to an abstraction, to an inanimate object, or to the absent.”O God, God/ How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable/ Seem to me the uses of this world!”
antithesis Juxtaposition of contrasting words or ideas (often, although not always, in parallel structure).
monologue a long and typically tedious speech by one person during a conversation.
soliloquy an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself or regardless of any hearers, especially by a character in a play.
chiasmus Repetition of ideas in inverted orderRepetition of grammatical structures in inverted order”Suit the action to the word, the word to the action.”
hyperbole Rhetorical exaggeration.”What a piece of work is man, how noble in reason… infinite in faculties…
oxymoron Placing two ordinarily opposing terms adjacent to one another. A compressed paradox.”goodly king” “Honest Soldier”” But my uncle-father, aunt-mother.”